Gambol


Gambol is a wall-hopping, ceiling-slapping jaunt of a platformer with straight forward controls, and buttery smooth movement. You control the Gambol Gumball through a gauntlet of levels designed with flow and rhythm in mind to test your platforming grit.

Frequency asked questions and rumours

When was Gambol released?

Gambol was released on 27 Mar, 2018

Who was the developer that made Gambol?

Mike Pickering were the developers that made Gambol

What does the word gambol meaning?

to skip about in play

How do you remember the meaning of gambol?

gambol rhymes with gamble (gambling)….so de game of gambling is played in a highly spirited fashion by a set of ppl. SYN:cavort,curvet,caper,frolic,disport, frisk,lark,play,rollick,romp,skylark. 6 2.

Do lambs gambol or gamble?

Meaning of gambol in English to run and jump in a happy way: Lambs were gambolling (about/around) in the spring sunshine.18 May 2022

Where does the word gambol come from?

In Middle French, the noun gambade referred to the frisky spring of a jumping horse. In the early 1500s, English speakers adopted the word as gambol as both a verb and a noun.

What is the best meaning for Gambol?

to skip about in play

Why is it called a gambol?

gambol (n.) “frolic, merrymaking,” 1590s, earlier gambolde “a skipping, a leap or spring” (1510s), from French gambade (15c.), from Late Latin gamba “horse’s hock or leg,” from Greek kampē “a bending” (on notion of “a joint”); see campus.

How do you use gambol in a sentence?

– My dog is always happy to gambol with the other pooches at the park.
– Because of the rain, students are unable to gambol on the playground during recess.
– To stay in shape, my husband likes to gambol along the beach every morning.

What is a gambol also known as?

gambol in American English SYNONYMS 1. spring, caper, frisk, romp.

What is gambol used for?

verb (used without object), gam·boled, gam·bol·ing or (especially British) gam·bolled, gam·bol·ling. to skip about, as in dancing or playing; frolic. a skipping or frisking about; frolic.

What animal is gambol?

In Middle French, the noun gambade referred to the frisky spring of a jumping horse. In the early 1500s, English speakers adopted the word as gambol as both a verb and a noun.