Grey Goo


Fight for control of a frontier world. Gather resources, build your base, and command your forces in battle. Survive long enough to unleash your ultimate weapon – THE EPIC.

Frequency asked questions and rumours

When was Grey Goo released?

Grey Goo was released on 23 Jan, 2015

Who was the developer that made Grey Goo?

Petroglyph, Six Foot were the developers that made Grey Goo

Is grey goo possible?

Though the possibility of gray goo becoming a reality is extremely low, some scientists have raised concern over the energy needs of a possible nano invention that could replicate at the molecular level.

Are nanobots used today?

It is largely used now for so-called DNA nanorobots, defined as intelligent drug delivery systems that respond to molecular triggers (Li et al., 2018). While these are not the science-fictional submarines traveling through our blood, they are quite similar to some of the early nanofuturist visions.

Are nanobots being used today?

These tiny, nano-sized robots are currently disrupting the field of biomedicine, with particular advancements occurring in applications such as cancer diagnosis and drug delivery.16 Jun 2021

Are nanobots being used today 2021?

Novel research shows that nanomedicine and biomedical applications of nanobots will lead the global market between 2021 and 2029. … Nanobots are just one aspect of the growing field of nanotechnology, they have been developed for a diverse range of applications across a wide variety of industries and fields.3 Dec 2021

Does grey goo exist?

What is Grey Goo? Not necessarily grey, and not necessarily gooey, “grey goo” is both a nanotechnological substance which increases exponentially without practical limit, and a hypothetical scenario in which the mass of planet Earth – or the universe – is ecotophaged into self-replicating nanobots.7 Jan 2012

Is grey goo real?

Gray goo (also spelled grey goo) is a hypothetical global catastrophic scenario involving molecular nanotechnology in which out-of-control self-replicating machines consume all biomass on Earth while building more of themselves, a scenario that has been called ecophagy (“eating the environment”, more literally “eating …Gray goo (also spelled grey goo) is a hypothetical global catastrophicglobal catastrophicExistential risks are defined as “risks that threaten the destruction of humanity’s long-term potential.” The instantiation of an existential risk (an existential catastrophe) would either cause outright human extinction or irreversibly lock in a drastically inferior state of affairs.https://en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Global_catastrophic_riskGlobal catastrophic risk – Wikipedia scenario involving molecular nanotechnology in which out-of-control self-replicating machines consume all biomass on Earth while building more of themselves, a scenario that has been called ecophagy (“eating the environment”, more literally “eating …

Why is it called gray goo?

grey goo, a nightmarish scenario of nanotechnology in which out-of-control self-replicating nanobots destroy the biosphere by endlessly producing replicas of themselves and feeding on materials necessary for life. The term was coined by American engineer Eric Drexler in his book Engines of Creation (1986).

Are nanobots in use today?

Nanobots in 2018: Three recent advances shaping the future of research. The field of nanotechnologies, which studies phenomena at the nanometer scale, 1 to 100 nanometers, is today in full expansion and finds applications in medicine, electronics and the development of new materials.

What is Nanite acid?

A nanite is built by manipulating atoms and contains gigabytes of computer memory. It is small enough to enter living cells and can be programmed to do numerous tasks. Nanites are used by the Star Confederation for medical purposes and are designed to work inside nucleii during cellular surgery.

What is gray goo made of?

grey goo, a nightmarish scenario of nanotechnology in which out-of-control self-replicating nanobots destroy the biosphere by endlessly producing replicas of themselves and feeding on materials necessary for life. The term was coined by American engineer Eric Drexler in his book Engines of Creation (1986).