Poi


Poi is a 3D platformer featuring two kids on a grand adventure to unravel the mysteries of the Milky Way Globe. Explore uncharted lands, compete in challenge levels, meet quirky characters and defeat comical creatures on a journey to become a Master Explorer.

Frequency asked questions and rumours

When was Poi released?

Poi was released on 1 Feb, 2017

Who was the developer that made Poi?

PolyKid were the developers that made Poi

What does poi taste like?

Fermented, or sour, poi tastes like nondairy yogurt. And just like sourdough starter, it develops flavor with age. “Sour poi kept original Hawaiians alive,” says Adam Asquith, a farmer who grows 40 acres of taro on Kauai’s east side.20 Apr 2018

What kind of food is poi?

poi, starchy Polynesian food paste made from the taro root. In Samoa and other Pacific islands, poi is a thick paste of pounded bananas or pineapples mixed with coconut cream; the word originally denoted the action of pounding the food to a pulp.

What is Hawaiian poi?

In Samoa and other Pacific islands, poi is a thick paste of pounded bananas or pineapples mixed with coconut cream; the word originally denoted the action of pounding the food to a pulp. In Hawaii, where poi is a staple of local cuisine, taro root is used almost exclusively for its preparation.

What does poi look like?

Fermentation. Poi has a paste-like texture and a delicate flavor when freshly prepared in the traditional manner, with a pale purple color that naturally comes from the taro corm. It has a smooth, creamy texture.

What is the flavor of poi?

Fermented, or sour, poi tastes like nondairy yogurt. And just like sourdough starter, it develops flavor with age. “Sour poi kept original Hawaiians alive,” says Adam Asquith, a farmer who grows 40 acres of taro on Kauai’s east side.20 Apr 2018

Do Hawaiians really eat poi?

Although many of the world’s people consume taro, only Hawaiians make poi. Hawaiians traditionally cook the starchy, potato-like heart of the taro corm for hours in an underground oven called an imu, which is also used to cook other types of food such as pork, carrots, and sweet potatoes.Although many of the world’s people consume taro, only Hawaiians make poi. Hawaiians traditionally cook the starchy, potato-like heart of the taro corm for hours in an underground oven called an imu, which is also used to cookto cookA cuisine is a style of cooking characterized by distinctive ingredients, techniques and dishes, and usually associated with a specific culture or geographic region. Regional food preparation traditions, customs and ingredients often combine to create dishes unique to a particular region.https://en.wikipedia.org › wiki › CuisineCuisine – Wikipedia other types of food such as pork, carrots, and sweet potatoes.

Does poi taste good?

It has a smooth, creamy texture. The flavor changes distinctly once the poi has been made: fresh poi is sweet and edible; each day thereafter the poi loses sweetness and turns sour due to a natural fermentation that involves lactobacillus bacteria, yeast, and Geotrichum fungi.

What is poi and how do you eat it?

Poi is the staple starch of Hawaiian food. Made from the root of the taro (kalo) plant, it’s sticky, sweet, and a bit sour. It’s a Hawaii must-try food.25 Jul 2019

What are the benefits of eating poi?

It is a superfood, for one thing: a fat-free, high-fiber, low-sodium, gluten-free source of vitamin B, calcium and phosphorus. It sustained the Polynesians who took taro to the islands centuries ago, for reasons that are newly appreciated today.16 Jul 2003

Is poi sweet or savory?

On a stone tool, which people still use today, the cooked poi is mixed with water and then pounded into a thin or thick paste, depending on preference. When fresh, the poi is sweet and often consumed as a dessert. When given some time, the poi becomes a bit sour and is perfect as an addition to savory meals.6 Apr 2018

Why Do Hawaiians eat poi?

Poi was considered such an important and sacred aspect of daily Hawaiian life that Hawaiians believed that the spirit of Hāloa, the legendary ancestor of the Hawaiian people, was present when a bowl of poi was uncovered for consumption at the family dinner table.